Do I Need STD/STI Testing?

DO I NEED STD/STI TESTING?

  • If you have had unprotected sex
  • If you have a new partner (or more than one partner)

Then the answer is YES! The recent move to rename Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) with the term Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI)is intended to broaden the concept to include curable diseases that often show few symptoms.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STD/STI AND HIV SCREENING (CDC)

  • All adults and adolescents from ages 13 to 64 should be tested once for HIV
  • Annual chlamydia screening of all sexually active women younger than 25 years, as well as older women with risk factors such as new or multiple sex partners, or a sex partner who has a sexually transmitted infection.
  • Annual gonorrhea screening of all sexually active women younger than 25 years, as well as older women with risk factors such as new or multiple sex partners, or a sex partner who has a sexually transmitted infection.
  • Screening at least once a year for syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea for all sexually active gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) MSM who have multiple or anonymous partners should be screened more frequently for STDs/STI’s (3-6 months intervals)
  • Anyone who has unsafe sex or who shares injection drug equipment should be tested for HIV at least once a year
  • Syphilis, HIV, chlamydia, and hepatitis B screening for all pregnant women and gonorrhea screening for at-risk pregnant women starting in early pregnancy and repeat testing as needed
  • Hepatitis C testing for Women born 1945-1965 and women with other risk factors like IV drug use
  • Herpes type specific testing should be considered for women presenting for STD/STI screening
  • Trichomonas should be considered for women with multiple sexual partners

SYMPTOMS OF STD/STI

Most of the time there are either minimal symptoms and signs or no symptoms and signs at all of the STD (sexually transmitted disease). This is why the name is being replaced by STI (sexually transmitted infection) to encompass the idea that some STIs will not present with signs and symptoms of a disease. If you have had unprotected sex, you have a new partner, you have more than one partner, or if for any reason are worried you have been exposed to an STD/STI talk to your healthcare provider about getting tested.

HOW DO STI TESTS WORK?

Getting tested can be quick and easy. Depending on what test is being performed  your provider may take a blood sample, a swab, or ask for you a urine sample. Below is a list describing how what is done to test for each STI.

CHLAMYDIA

Swab or urine sample

More info @ http://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/chlamydia-factsheet-june-2014.pdf

GONORRHEA

gono

 

Swab or urine sample

More info @ http://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/gon-factsheet-july-2014.pdf 

 

HIV

HIV virus

 

Blood specimen

More info @ http://www.cdc.gov/std/hiv/hiv-std-factsheet-dec-2014.pdf 

 

HERPES WITHOUT SYMPTOMS

Blood sample for type IgG test

More info @ http://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/herpes-factsheet-july-2014.pdf

HERPES WITH SYMPTOMS

Swab

SYPHILIS

Treponema

 

Blood sample or swab from a sore

More info at http://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/syphilis-factsheet-july-2014.pdf

 

TRICHOMONAS

trich-228

 

Swab 

More info @ http://www.cdc.gov/std/trichomonas/trich-fact-sheet-aug-2012.pdf

 

 

HPV GENITAL WARTS

Visual inspection and at times biopsy

HPV

Testing can be done during routine Pap 

Other STIs

More info @ http://www.cdc.gov/std/general/other.htm

ADOLESCENTS

 

youth-sti-infographic

From the Centers for Disease Control Website @ 

http://www.cdc.gov/std/products/youth-sti-infographic.pdf

PREVENTION

One of the most important aspects of prevention of STIs is the use of safe sex practices. Women under 26 are encouraged to be vaccinated against HPV types 16 and 18 which are often seen in cervical cancers

NOTIFICATION

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are notified of positive test results for HIV, Syphilis, Gonorrhea, and Chlamydia tests. These are public health concerns and it is the function of the CDC to maintain accurate records that permit effective disease surveillance and the CDC is also responsible for helping develop policy and guidelines for managing communicable diseases. 

 

ALL images were retrieved from the CDC website. http://www.cdc.gov/