Approaching the Holidays With Calm Confidence: Dealing With Holiday Stress

Approaching the Holidays with Calm Confidence

 

Holiday Stress 

As the holidays approach, many women anticipate feeling stressed. This can detract from the essence of the season. Much of the stress during the holidays comes from there being too much to do and not enough time to do it. If you know this, you can change your approach to the holidays and proceed with calm confidence. The staff of Asheville Gynecology & Wellness would like to share a few tips to help you embrace the holidays more joyfully. is a season to gather with friends and family, to share with others, and to show that you care—key elements of the holidays.

Tips

  1. Plan ahead. Make a TO DO Lists and separate the list into items you HAVE TO do, those you ENJOY doing, and those you’d prefer to FORGO or DECLINE.
  2. Know your limits.
    1. Be willing to SAY NO. If this is hard for you, try saying no to at least one thing that is not on your list.
    2. Ask for help. Reach out and ask for assistance and be prepared to assist others in return.
    3. Don’t neglect your sleep.
  3. Focus on one thing at a time. A 2009 Stanford University study showed that people performance on various tasks suffers when we multitask.[i] who multitask per
  4. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Let things go. Nothing’s going to be perfect. Relax and enjoy time with family and friends, even if a pie burns or your team loses. Reconcile the situation, move on, and forget about it!
  5. Be flexible. Plans change. When plans need to change, take a moment to regroup and prepare go in a different direction. Trust yourself and trust that things will work out.
  6. Take care of yourself.
    1. Stay hydrated. This is one of the easiest things to overlook.
    2. Eat nutritious foods.
    3. Remember exercise releases endorphins
  7. Avoid caffeine and sugary foods and drinks. Caffeine speeds up the nervous system, increases heart rate, and increases the rate of our breathing—all these can provoke feelings of stress.
  8. Consume calming drinks: Chamomile tea, Green tea, Green Mulberry tea, and others.    
  9. Eat calming foods. Emphasize foods that are easy to digest and that contain nutrients thought to calm the nervous system, foster relaxation, and boost mood naturally. Foods containing magnesium, vitamin B 12 (and other B vitamins), zinc, and antioxidants can help you manage stress. Certain herbal supplements like kava and passionflower are touted as calming ingredients.
    1. Omega-3s Foods rich in Omega 3 fatty acids such as walnuts, salmon, flax seed, chia seeds, cooked spinach, and omega 3 fortified eggs have anti-inflammatory properties that can reduce pain and these foods may support brain health.
    2. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid required for the production of serotonin. Serotonin is important in the regulation of mood and emotions and can foster feelings of calm. Absorption of tryptophan can be improved by combining tryptophan rich foods with complex carbohydrates such as whole grains and fruit. Good sources of tryptophan include seeds and nuts, chicken, reduced fat mozzarella, tuna, oat bran, eggs, shrimp, spinach, chicken, beans, tofu, milk, salmon asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, and of course, turkey.
    3. Blueberries, Maca Root, Acai Berries. These all are high in anti-oxidants and other phytonutrients that may produce calm.
    4. Zinc rich foods can help stabilize metabolic rate, balance blood sugar, and boost the immune system. Zinc is a trace element found in sesame seeds, pumpkins seeds seafood, wheat germ, squash, nuts, beans, chicken and even chocolate.  
  10. Remember the Deeper Reasons for the Holidays. The deeper significance of the holidays provides a framework that can keep you grounded.

 

Breathe and remain mindful of others as well as yourself. Remind yourself daily basis that when you remain calm your effect on others will become calming.

Gratitude & Joy

Engage the holidays confidently and calmly and seek opportunities to cultivate an attitude of joy and gratitude.

 

 

[i] http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15583.full.pdf?sid=8fbb01ba-145b-4cff-80fb-1238c3df28c9